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Christmas Decoration Safety

posted: 02/Dec/2016
Some unusual household pet injuries can arise during the festive period. Here are five simple tips to help keep pets safe this Christmas.
 

Christmas tree safety:

If you have a kitten or cat who loves to climb, make sure your Christmas tree is safely secured to the ground and cannot easily topple. Clean up any tree needles that fall from the branches of live trees as they can puncture pets’ intestines if consumed. For fake synthetic trees, make sure you stabilise individual branch sections to avoid any accidents. 
 

Christmas lights and power cords:

Cords should be kept neat, tidy and out of sight from pets. If your puppy or kitten is teething and chewing, be extra cautious with extension leads as they are soft and highly desirable chew objects.
 

Ornaments:

It's a good idea to inspect your ornaments for sharp objects such as pins and exposed hooks, also opt for plastic ornaments over glass to reduce the risk of breakages and your pet ingesting anything dangerous. 
 

Tinsel:

Cats love to play with string and tinsel presents a much shinier proposition. Tinsel and large lengths of ribbon can play havoc in the intestines once digested. If your cat is particularly interested in lengths of string, then close supervision may be required, or avoid using string and tinsel all together. 
 

Yard decorations:

Yard decorations can prove just as dangerous to pets as tree decorations. Try staking the wire frames of display items into the ground with ordinary tent stakes. This will make them difficult for your pet to pull out.
 
Avoid exciting their attention. Part of the problem may be your own excitement to show off shiny decorations. Avoid decorating the tree or house when they are present and don't show them the objects, especially not in a playful or excited way. They may interpret this as an invitation to play with them.
 
Please contact Greencross Vets immediately if your pet ingests something they shouldn’t, or is negatively affected by coming into contact with Christmas decorations.
 
 


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